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Vintage Oklahoma A&M Aggies canvas art by Row One Brand

Made from authentic 1942 artwork in the Row One Collection of over 10,000 vintage sports images. America's Best Sports Gifts™ as seen on Forbes.com

3D shadow effect.

Stunning bright orange canvas art.

Ready to hang with a wire hanger and dust cover back.

1.5 inch wide sides.

Shipped within 7 business days.

Printed in the U.S.A. 

ROW ONE. REAL RETRO.

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oklahoma_State_University%E2%80%93Stillwater#History

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ 


Read about Oklahoma State University and Oklahoma A&M's history below via Wikipedia.

 

 

 
Old Central at Oklahoma A&M, 1894

 

On December 25, 1890, the Oklahoma Territorial Legislature finally gained approval for Oklahoma Territorial Agricultural and Mechanical (A&M) College, the land-grantuniversity established under the Morrill Act of 1862. It specified that the college was to be within Payne County. Such an ambiguous description created rivalry between towns within the county, with Stillwater ultimately winning out. Upon statehood in 1907, "Territorial" was dropped from its title.

 

 
Oklahoma A&M seal

 

The first students assembled for class on December 14, 1891. Classes were held for two and one-half years in local churches until the first academic building, later known asOld Central, was dedicated on June 15, 1894, on the southeast corner of campus, which at the time was flat plowed prairie.[13] In 1896, Oklahoma A&M held its first commencement with six male graduates. The first Library was established in Old Central in one room shared with the English Department. The first campus building to have electricity, Williams Hall, was constructed in 1900. With its turreted architecture it was referred to as the "Castle of the Prairies";[14] It remained standing until 1969. One of the earliest campus buildings was also a barn, used as part of an agricultural experiment station, which was served by a large reservoir pond created in 1895. The barn burned in 1922, but the pond, enlarged and remodeled in 1928 and 1943, is now known as Theta Pond, a popular campus scenic landmark.[15] In 1906, Morrill Hall was completed and became the principal building on campus. A fire gutted the building in 1914, but the outside structure survived intact, and the interior was reconstructed. The first dormitory for women was completed in 1911. It contained a kitchen, dining hall, some classrooms, and a women's gymnasium. It is now the Bartlett Center for the Studio Arts and houses the Gardiner Art Gallery.[16] By 1919 the campus included Morrill Hall, the Central Building, the Engineering Building (now Gundersen Hall), the Women's building, the Auditorium (replaced later by the Seretean Center for Performing Arts),[17] the Armory-Gymnasium (now the Architecture Building) and the Power Plant.[18]

 

At the beginning of World War II, Oklahoma A&M was one of six schools selected by the United States Navy to give the Primary School in the Electronics Training Program(ETP), also known as Naval Training School Elementary Electricity and Radio Materiel (NTS EE&RM).[19] Starting in March 1942, each month a new group of 100 Navy students arrived for three months of 14-hour days in concentrated electrical engineering study. Cordell Hall, the newest dormitory, was used for housing and meals; lectures and lab sessions were held in the Engineering Building. Professor Emory B. Phillips was the Director of Instruction. ETP admission required passing the Eddy Test, one of the most selective qualifying exams given during the war years.[20] At a given time, some 500 Navy students were on the campus, a significant fraction of the war-years enrollment. The training activity continued until June 1945, and served a total of about 7,000 students; among these was Robert B. Kamm, a future professor and president of Oklahoma State University.[21][22] During some of the war years, the Navy also had a Yeoman training activity for WAVES and SPARS on the campus.

 

 
Student Union Building at OSU

 

Much of the growth of Oklahoma A&M and the campus architectural integrity can be attributed to work of Henry G. Bennett, who served as the school's president from 1928 to 1950. Early in his tenure Dr. Bennett developed a strategic vision for the physical expansion of the university campus. The plan was adopted in 1937 and his vision was followed for more than fifty years, making the university what it is today, including the Georgian architecture that permeates the campus. The focal point of his vision was a centrally located library building, which became a reality when theEdmon Low Library opened in 1953. Another major addition to the campus during the Bennett years was the construction of the Student Union, which opened in 1950. Subsequent additions and renovations have made the building one of the largest student union buildings in the world at 611,000 sq ft (56,800 m2).[23] A complete renovation and further expansion of the building began in 2010.

 

 
Statue of Henry G. Bennett near Library Lawn at OSU

 

On May 15, 1957, Oklahoma A&M changed its name for the final time to Oklahoma State University to reflect the broadening scope of curriculum offered. (Oklahoma Gov. Raymond Gary signed the bill authorizing the name change passed by the 26th Oklahoma Legislature on May 15, 1957. However, the bill only authorized the Board of Regents to change the name of the college, a measure they voted on at their meeting on June 6. The official name - Oklahoma State University of Agricultural and Applied Sciences - took effect July 1. The latter portion of the name was dropped in 1980.) Subsequently, the Oklahoma State University System was created, with the Stillwater campus as the flagship institution and several outlying branches: OSU-Institute of Technology in Okmulgee (1946),OSU-Oklahoma City (1961), OSU-Tulsa (1984), and the Center for Health Sciences also in Tulsa (1988).[24]

 

In 2005, OSU announced its "Campus Master Plan", a campaign to enhance academic, athletic, and administrative facilities. Over $800 million is ear-marked for campus construction and renovation over twenty years. The Plan calls for an "athletic village" where all of the university's athletic facilities will be located on the main campus. To accomplish this goal, the athletic department bought all (or nearly all) the property north of Boone Pickens Stadium up to McElroy between Knoblock and Washington streets. This drew criticism from the city of Stillwater and property owners.[25] While the vast majority of the real estate was rental property targeting college students, a few owners were longtime residents. There was a lone holdout in this parcel of land, who sued OSU over their right to use eminent domain.[26] The case was decided in favor of the University. The project includes the construction of an indoor practice facility for most sports, a soccer stadium/outdoor track, a tennis complex, and a baseball stadium.

 

 
Edmon Low Library

 

In 2006, OSU became the recipient of a gift of $165 million from alumnus T. Boone Pickens to the university's athletic department, and in 2008 received another gift from Pickens of $100 million for endowed academic chairs. It was the largest gift for academics ever given in the state.[27] Ethical concerns have been raised in media reports about the propriety of how some of the Pickens gifts have been made, immediately returned to Pickens, and then placed in hedge funds owned by Pickens' companies[28] In February, 2010, Pickens announced that he was pledging another $100 million to fund a scholarship endowment as part of a $1 billion fund-raising campaign titled "Branding Success." The pledge brought the total pledged or contributed to OSU by Pickens to over $500 million.[29]


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Vintage Oklahoma A&M Aggies Art by Row One Brand

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