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Row One Brand vintage sports art made from a collection of over 10,000 historic sports images.

As seen on Forbes.com

1966 Cincinnati Reds baseball canvas art by Row One Brand

Made from an authentic '66 Cincinnati Reds baseball scorecard.

Fantastic vintage baseball wall art for home or office.

 

  • Superior quality canvas art that comes ready to hang with a wire hanger 
  • Dust cover back
  • 1.5 inch wide sides 
  • Comes in three sizes 
  • Digitally restored for vivid color
  • Shipped within 7 business days
  • Printed in the U.S.A.  

 

ROW ONE. REAL RETRO. 

 

Not affiliated with, licensed, sponsored, or endorsed by any team, league, or licensing entity. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cincinnati_Reds


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The Cincinnati Reds are an American professional baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Reds compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. They were a charter member of the American Association in 1882 and joined the NL in 1890.[1]

The Reds played in the NL West division from 1969 to 1993, before joining the Central division in 1994. They have won five World Series titles, nine NL pennants, one AA pennant, and 10 division titles. The team plays its home games at Great American Ball Park, which opened in 2003 replacing Riverfront StadiumBob Castellini has been chief executive officer since 2006.

 

1941–1969 Cincinnati Reds History

 
The Reds played at Crosley Field, pictured here in 1969, from 1912–1970

World War II and age finally caught up with the Reds. Throughout the 1940s and early 1950s, Cincinnati finished mostly in the second division. In 1944, Joe Nuxhall (who was later to become part of the radio broadcasting team), at age 15, pitched for the Reds on loan from Wilson Junior High school in Hamilton, Ohio. He became the youngest player ever to appear in a major league game—a record that still stands today. Ewell "The Whip" Blackwell was the main pitching stalwart before arm problems cut short his career. Ted Kluszewski was the NL home run leader in 1954. The rest of the offense was a collection of over-the-hill players and not-ready-for-prime-time youngsters.

In April 1953, the Reds, fearing that their traditional club nickname would associate them with the threat of Communism, officially changed the name of the team to the "Cincinnati Redlegs".[2] From 1956 to 1960, the club's logo was altered to remove the term "REDS" from the inside of the "wishbone C" symbol. The "REDS" reappeared on the 1961 uniforms, but the point of the C was removed, leaving a smooth, non-wishbone curve. The traditional home-uniform logo was restored in 1967.

In 1956, led by National League Rookie of the Year Frank Robinson, the Redlegs hit 221 HR to tie the NL record. By 1961, Robinson was joined by Vada PinsonWally PostGordy Coleman, and Gene Freese. Pitchers Joey JayJim O'Toole, and Bob Purkey led the staff.

The Reds captured the 1961 National League pennant, holding off the Los Angeles Dodgers and the San Francisco Giants, only to be defeated by the perennially powerful New York Yankees in the World Series.

The Reds had winning teams during the rest of the 1960s, but did not produce any championships. They won 98 games in 1962, paced by Purkey's 23, but finished third. In 1964, they lost the pennant by one game to the Cardinals after having taken first place when the Phillies collapsed in September. Their beloved manager Fred Hutchinson died of cancer just weeks after the end of the 1964 season. The failure of the Reds to win the 1964 pennant led to owner Bill DeWitt's selling off key components of the team, in anticipation of relocating the franchise. In response to DeWitt's threatened move, the women of Cincinnati banded together to form the Rosie Reds to urge DeWitt to keep the franchise in Cincinnati. The Rosie Reds are still in existence, and are currently the oldest fan club in Major League Baseball. After the 1965 season he executed what may be the most lopsided trade in baseball history, sending former Most Valuable Player Frank Robinson to the Baltimore Orioles for pitchers Milt Pappas and Jack Baldschun, and outfielder Dick Simpson. Robinson went on to win the MVP and triple crown in the American league for 1966, and lead Baltimore to its first ever World Series title in a sweep of the Los Angeles Dodgers. The Reds did not recover from this trade until the rise of the "Big Red Machine" of the 1970s.

Starting in the early 1960s, the Reds' farm system began producing a series of stars, including Jim Maloney (the Reds' pitching ace of the 1960s), Pete RoseTony PérezJohnny BenchLee MayTommy Helms,Bernie CarboHal McRaeDave Concepción, and Gary Nolan. The tipping point came in 1967 with the appointment of Bob Howsam as general manager. That same year the Reds avoided a move to San Diego when the city of Cincinnati and Hamilton County agreed to build a state of the art, downtown stadium on the edge of the Ohio River. The Reds entered into a 30-year lease in exchange for the stadium commitment keeping the franchise in its original home city. In a series of strategic moves, Howsam brought in key personnel to complement the homegrown talent. The Reds' final game at Crosley Field, home to more than 4,500 baseball games, was played on June 24, 1970, a 5–4 victory over the San Francisco Giants.

Under Howsam's administration starting in the late 1960s, the Reds instituted a strict rule barring the team's players from wearing facial hair and long hair. The clean cut look was meant to present the team as wholesome in an era of turmoil. All players coming to the Reds were required to shave and cut their hair for the next three decades. Over the years, the rule was controversial, but persisted well into the ownership ofMarge Schott. On at least one occasion, in the early 1980s, enforcement of this rule lost them the services of star reliever and Ohio native Rollie Fingers, who would not shave his trademark handlebar mustache in order to join the team.[3] The rule was not officially rescinded until 1999 when the Reds traded for slugger Greg Vaughn, who had a goatee. The New York Yankees continue to have a similar rule today, though unlike the Reds during this period, Yankees players are permitted to have mustaches. Much like when players leave the Yankees today, players who left the Reds took advantage with their new teams; Pete Rose, for instance, grew his hair out much longer than would be allowed by the Reds once he signed with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1979.

The Reds' rules also included conservative uniforms. In Major League Baseball, a club generally provides most of the equipment and clothing needed for play. However, players are required to supply their gloves and shoes themselves. Many players enter into sponsorship arrangements with shoe manufacturers, but through the mid-1980s, the Reds had a strict rule that players were to wear only plain black shoes with no prominent logo. Reds players decried what they considered to be the boring color choice as well as the denial of the opportunity to earn more money through shoe contracts. A compromise was struck in which players were allowed to wear red shoes.

 

 


  • Item #: 66-REDS

1966 Cincinnati Reds Baseball Wall Art by Row One Brand

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